Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

Day Zero now likely to happen – NEW EMERGENCY MEASURES

From the City of Cape Town.

18 JANUARY 2018


In summary:

  • Day Zero is now likely
  • 60% of Capetonians won’t save water and we must now force them
  • Punitive tariff to force high users to reduce demand
  • 50 litres per person per day for the next 150 days
  • Drought Charge likely to be scrapped by Council

We have reached a point of no return. Despite our urging for months, 60% of Capetonians are callously using more than 87 litres per day. It is quite unbelievable that a majority of people do not seem to care and are sending all of us headlong towards Day Zero. At this point we must assume that they will not change their behaviour and that the chance of reaching Day Zero on 21 April 2018 is now very likely.

The people who are still wasting water seem to believe that Day Zero just can’t happen or that the City’s seven augmentation projects – set to produce around 200 million litres per day – will be enough to save us. This is not the case and, while our water augmentation programme will make Cape Town more water resilient in the future, it was never going to be enough to stop Day Zero.

The crisis has reached a new severity, necessitating a series of new emergency measures:

A punitive tariff

We can no longer ask people to stop wasting water. We must force them. We have listened to the comments of thousands of residents asking for fairness. Council will on Friday be voting on a punitive tariff that will charge residents exponentially higher rates for water usage above 6 000 litres per month.

The table below outlines the difference between the current and the proposed punitive tariffs:

Consumption per month Current Tariffs – total household water bill New Tariff – total household water bill
6 000 litres


R28.44 R145.98
10 500 litres R109.50 R390.82
20 000 litres


R361.06 R1 536.28
35 000 litres


R1 050.04 R6 939.57
50 000 litres


R2 888.81 R20 619.57

I will personally fight to ensure that the proposed punitive tariff exempts those who are using less than 6 000 litres per month.

Provision will be made for households larger than four people to ensure that they are not unfairly penalised. We ask residents to contact the City beforehand on or enquire at their nearest walk-in centre.

The proposed Drought Charge is likely to be dropped after a massive outcry from Capetonians that it was unfair. I understand that response and it has personally been a tough lesson for the City. I just want you to know that the City proposed the charge because we wanted to keep delivering important and essential services during this crisis. I wanted to continue making Cape Town a city that delivers opportunities for all. We are now going to have to make deep cuts to important projects.

50 litres per day for 150 days

We will be moving to level 6B restrictions with a new limit of 50 litres per person per day to make up for the many months of missing the 500 million litre per day collective consumption target. The new restrictions will come into effect on 1 February 2018.

The new daily collective consumption target is now 450 million litres per day. This will be in place for 150 days after which the City will reassess the situation.

Level 6B restrictions will also limit irrigation using boreholes and wellpoints.

Advanced Day Zero preparation

The City has also advanced its planning for Day Zero with approximately 200 sites having been assessed. The City will be announcing everyone’s local collection points from next week so that communities can begin preparing for that eventuality.

We will also be making detailed Day Zero contingency plans available soon to answer all questions that residents and businesses might have.

In terms of the City’s work, we have been working hard to reduce demand through advanced pressure management, massively ramping up the installation of water management devices at high consumption households.  Our teams are also significantly intensifying the leak detection and repair programme, and we are rolling out education and awareness campaigns and extending our use of the treated effluent system which offsets the use of the drinking water for non-potable purposes.

Teams are working around the clock to deliver the emergency plan for desalination, groundwater and water reuse. But, as I have already said, this alone will simply not be enough to avoid Day Zero without savings from all residents.

Cape Town, this is the moment where we can bring about the fundamental behaviour change that is needed to save us all from running out of water.

The time to act for everyone’s sake is now.

So if we reduce the demand enough now, we can still get our water delivered to our houses and not have to queue daily for our allocation.

For more information

This post was sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

No More Bare Feet – Uphawu

What it is?
“No More Bare Feet” was established in 2016 by Mondeka Mabibini, as the second leg of the Uphawu Community
Development organisation, of which she is the founder.

What’s our Aim?

The aim of the No More Bare Feet campaign is to give children in the rural areas of the Eastern Cape, where she comes from, shoes to wear to school. Many children are from poor backgrounds and their parents cannot afford to buy school shoes for them. Here poverty is dire and children have to walk up to 10km or more kilometres a day in order to get to and from school.

STBB’s involvement
With the support of national law firm STBB I Smith Tabata Buchanan Boyes, the campaign is now in its third year. All
shoes collected are distributed during the first two weeks of the school term to the schools. The vision is to motivate
or lift up the school children’s dignity and self-esteem.

How your donation helps
By donating a pair of shoes today, you:
• Make a difference to a child who walks to school barefoot over rough terrain, winter and summer;
• Instill self-esteem and confidence in the learners;
• Help build the learner’s dignity.

To those who are able to assist in this very worthy cause, either with a new pair of shoes or used shoes of any size, please drop off at any of our Chas Everitt Offices.

Locations:  Tokai, Bergvliet, Claremont and Fish Hoek before the 8 December 2017

Makes a huge difference to these kids’ lives as also to their parents and any contribution will be appreciated.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

From: City of Cape Town

Dam storage levels are at 36.8%, with useable water at 26.8%. Collective water usage is 582 million litres, therefore 82 million litres above the required level of 500 million litres per day.

Our dam levels have declined by 1% over the past week. This could be attributed to the high winds and hot weather which contributed to evaporation. We have managed to halve Cape Town’s water usage with the help of 51% of our water users who have put tremendous efforts into saving water. We will only get through this crisis together. To make this partnership work even more effectively, I appeal to all water users, especially the 49% who are not saving water yet, to join us all as we escalate efforts to beat this drought. Your help is vital and we need you to come on board with Team Cape Town.

This summer with the heat and wind, we can expect a steady decline going forward, so continued savings are a must. We need to do more to bring our usage down while at the same time pulling out all of the stops to ensure that we implement various projects for additional water supply to help see us through to winter 2018. Additional supply goes hand in hand with further savings.

We have looked at ways to fund a first phase of water supply projects by relooking at our spend across the City to see which non-water-related projects we can temporarily postpone while protecting funds for basic and emergency services. Internally, we have made some tough decisions and we will continue to do what is in the best interests of the people of Cape Town, no matter how difficult the challenge. We will partly be funding our first seven additional water projects with this saving and reprioritised money which comprises some R2 billion. The first phase projects earmarked for these funds are the desalination plants at Monwabisi, Strandfontein, the V&A Waterfront, and Cape Town Harbour; the Atlantis and Cape Flats Aquifer projects; and the Zandvliet water recycling project make up the first seven emergency water projects of this phase.

An online toolkit has been developed with various resources for all to use to help us to drive this message. Please see our website,, to access material that you may require. This toolkit will be updated regularly.

For information on how to meet the daily water usage requirement, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: and utilise our water calculator:

Residents can contact the City via email to for queries about the water pressure reduction, or to report contraventions of the water restrictions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts), or they can send an SMS to 31373.
This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South


City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

From: City of Cape Town

The first water from the Oranjezicht Main Springs Chamber started flowing into the Molteno Reservoir today, 8 November 2017. This is part of the City of Cape Town’s ongoing Water Resilience Programme to increase the supply of drinking water. This project will see an additional two million litres per day of safe, clean drinking water added to the City’s bulk water network.

Three springs feed into the main collection chamber in Oranjezicht, where water is collected before being conveyed via a 525m long existing pipeline to the reservoir. The water is then chlorinated to bring it in line with the South African National Standard for drinking water (SANS 241).

The project entailed refurbishing for drinking water purposes the existing but disused pipeline, which takes the water from natural springs to the Molteno Reservoir. New chlorination equipment to dose the disinfectant along the pipeline linking it to the reservoir itself has also been installed.

When the City started investigating the possibility of using these springs as additional sources of drinking water in 2014, our Scientific Services Branch found that water from some of the springs was of a very high quality.

Previously, this untreated water from the main springs collection chamber was used for irrigation at the Green Point Urban Park, Cape Town Stadium and Green Point Athletics track.

From the commencement of the City’s investigation to this point of commissioning, the cost of this project amounted to around R4,1 million.

The City is committed to doing everything it can to ensure that Cape Town has sufficient drinking water to see us through the upcoming summer months, and beyond.

Last week I also visited the Atlantis Aquifer where refurbishment work by the City’s Water and Sanitation Management Department has increased yield from this source by an additional five million litres a day.

We will continue working on a range of augmentation plans, fast-tracking processes as much as possible to bring alternative sources of drinking water online, including desalination, ground water extraction, and water reuse as we build a water-resilient Cape Town. Together with the great water-saving efforts of residents, we will make it through this unprecedented drought.

This Post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Mayor De Lille visits desalination plant site at V&A Waterfront

Mayor De Lille visits desalination plant site at V&A Waterfront

Today I visited the site of one of the City of Cape Town’s modular land-based desalination plants. The plant will produce 2 million litres of water per day and this water will be fed into the City’s water distribution network by February 2018.

Last week I made a commitment to communicate directly with all Capetonians about the City’s work to secure alternative water sources.  My message is clear: we have a plan, we will supply water but Capetonians, your help is vital and so we need you to keep saving.  I want to thank and commend Capetonians for their great efforts and for being partners on this journey by saving water.  We managed to bring consumption down to 585 million litres of collective use per day from pre-restriction consumption levels of 1,1 billion litres per day.

We will not allow a well-run city to run out of water.

The City is securing our water resilience through saving and bringing more alternative water sources into our network.  One such water source is the temporary desalination plant the City is building on East Pier Road in the V&A Waterfront.  An open-air parking lot opposite the heliports will be converted into a desalination plant that will produce 2 million litres of water every day.  The V&A Waterfront made the land available to the City at no cost. This is a good example how government and business can work together to ensure our water resilience.  Water will be abstracted from the ocean on the harbour side of the pier, treated at the desalination plant and treated clean water will be pumped into the City’s water network near the site.  The location of the site makes it easy for the City to provide services to the desalination plant. The City will provide electricity in November 2017 and construction will start soon after.

The desalination plant is in addition to the eight other modular land-based desalination plants the City is implementing.

These are for the following sites:

  • Hout Bay – to produce 4 million litres per day
  • Granger Bay – to produce 8 million litres of water per day
  • Red Hill/Dido Valley – to produce 2 million litres of water per day
  • Strandfontein – to produce 7 million litres per day
  • Monwabisi – to produce 7 million litres per day
  • Harmony Park – to produce 8 million litres per day
  • Cape Town Harbour – to produce 50 million litres per day
  • The universal sites – to produce 20 million litres per day

On Friday the City awarded the tenders to the desalination plants at Strandfontein and Monwabisi.  The City is also working on groundwater abstraction at Atlantis and Silwerstroom, Cape Flats Aquifer, Cape Peninsula and Hottentots-Holland aquifers.  The City has already managed to increase the production capacity of the existing Atlantis and Silwerstroom aquifer by 5 million litres per day. This will increase incrementally to 25 million litres per day.  At the Zandvliet Wastewater Treatment Works, the pipeline work has already started and the yield will rise incrementally from this source to produce 10 million litres per day.  I am continually assessing the City’s solutions to provide alternative water sources while Capetonians continue to save.

We are not only building water resilience in the immediate future, but also looking ahead to the years to come and how we ensure water security beyond 2018.

Issued by: Media Office, City of Cape Town

Media enquiries: Xolani Koyana, Spokesperson for the Executive Mayor – Patricia de Lille, City of Cape Town, Tel: 021 400 5007 or Cell: 071 740 2219, Email: 

This important communication is shared via eNeighbourhoods Community Blogs
in a post sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South



Halloween Links including Jamie Oliver’s Guide to Pumpkin Carving!

Halloween Links including Jamie Oliver’s Guide to Pumpkin Carving!

Seriously here it is!

And here are more links!

Top 10 Children’s Halloween Costumes
Top 10 Women’s Halloween Costumes
Top 10 Men’s Halloween Costumes
Top 10 Mascot Halloween Costumes
Top 10 Pet Costumes
Top 10 College Costumes

and yes there are more – it’s spooky!

Halloween Costumes for the Handicapped
Halloween Countdown
Halloween Crafts
Halloween Dance
Halloween Decoration
Halloween eCards


Halloween History from
Halloween jokes from

This post is sponsored by the frighteningly friendly folk at of Chas Everitt Cape Town South
20% off on all grave plots this weekend!

Christmas Hampers for the Elderly in Need

Christmas Hampers for the Elderly in Need

“Our Mothers Our Fathers” – An odd name?  Well, most old people are someone’s mother or someone’s father, yet so many are alone with very little support.  Many of them are also simply too proud to ask for help and as a consequence the desperation of their circumstances is hidden.

OMOF was a name chosen to remind us all, that these senior citizens are entitled to dignity and compassion.  If you know of such a person who may need to be considered as a beneficiary of the OMOF initiative, rest assured the matter will be handled by Ann with great care and empathy.The OMOF Christmas hamper collection for the most deserving old and destitute people in the False Bay area has started!

You can really help make a difference to this special time of year and we are appealing for those who are prepared to donate to please do so early so we can get the hampers ready by the 10th of December but our volunteers will be delivering on Christmas Eve to make the hampers truly special.
We are also adding a wrapped GIFT inside each hamper to also make it just that much more special.

As usual, the Hamper Collection Progress Bars on our website have been reset to zero!

Thanking you in advance for your generosity.  To read more and view our progress bars (updated daily) Go to

Do you live in a Burglary Hot Spot or a Suburb Safe Zone?

neighbourhood“If property owners do not take collective action as a neighbourhood community, the affect on everyone’s property values in that neighbourhood could be very negative”, says Cape Town real estate broker, Andre de Villiers from Cape Town.

De Villiers was previously a Neighbourhood Watch Chairperson for a popular Cape Town coastal suburb. “My experience is that there are far too few residents prepared to get involved in neighbourhood security unless there is a dramatic spike in crime or a violent attack. The majority of residents it seems are only too happy to leave the collective security concerns to someone else”.

“As the owner of four real estate offices in Cape Town, I can confirm that buyers are increasingly asking agents for more details about security issues in the neighbourhood of the house they are interested in. The focus on the individual house’s security is correctly seen as something that can be resolved by the buyer, but the area’s reputation and crime statistics are a greater concern, as a buyer knows this will probably be an issue that falls outside their immediate control.”

There is certainly a demand for reliable data but this is not as easy to obtain as some may think. Many smaller incidents are not reported to the police and many private security services treat their information as confidential and many neighbourhood watch groups are understandably concerned that their neighbourhood could suffer if their efficiency in keeping records resulted in a negative message!

“I think any professional estate agent should have some reasonable methodology to answer security questions from buyers objectively about the neighbourhood. We can’t put our head in the sand over this issue and a lack of access to reliable data is certainly a challenge,” said de Villiers.

The message to property owners is to ‘buy in’ to the responsibility of keeping their neighbourhood safe and crime free through collective action, and thereby collecting a ‘collective security dividend’. “Imagine if you will, a pocket of houses that is able to claim and where the seller or agent can statistically show, that the subject area is the safest area in this suburb! If that’s not a great selling feature then, as a real estate professional with over thirty years experience, I am not sure what is!” said de Villiers.

Water Saving Tips

Cape-Town-Water-RestrictionsThe City of Cape Town is currently implementing Level 2 Water restrictions. This is due in part to the low dam levels. It is everyone’s responsibility to save water.

Here are some useful tips on how you can save water:

Save water throughout your home
  • Ensure all taps are fully closed – a dripping tap at 1 drip per second wastes up to 30 litres a day – that is equivalent to 10 000 litres a year.
  • Replace tap washers regularly and fit tap aerators to restrict and spread the flow. This saves water yet feels like you are using the same amount of water.
  • Ensure your plumbing system is regularly checked for leaks and engage a plumber when necessary.
Save water in your garden
  • Water your garden before 09:00 or after 16:00 (or even later on hot summer days). Avoid watering during windy periods and only water your garden when necessary.
  • Re-use your bath and sink water to water plants and lawns. Professional greywater recycling systems are also available for purchase.
  • If you have an overflow pipe that drips into the garden, place a bucket beneath the drips and use the saved water to water pot plants.
  • Mulching flowerbeds keeps down the weeds and holds moisture in the soil for longer.
  • Use a mulching lawn mower that allows clippings to be finely cut and blown back into the lawn.
  • Don’t mow lawns below 4 cm in length, as this reduces root depth and lawns are more likely to burn in summer.
  • Use a trigger nozzle with automatic shut-off on your hose when you wash your car, and use short bursts of water – this can save up to 300 litres each time. Or, to save even more water wash your vehicle using a bucket of water.
  • Use a trigger nozzle with automatic shut-off on your hose when you water your garden.
  • Check and maintain your irrigation system regularly, to ensure no water is running to waste, or that paved areas are being watered.
  • Adjust your irrigation system for the season and switch it off during rainy weather – even if it is borehole or wellpoint water.
  • Watering the garden less frequently, but deeper (for longer) encourages a deeper root system, which results in stronger plants. This practice can make water-wise plants out of most established plants.
Save water in your kitchen
  • Ensure washing machines or dishwashers have a full load before running them.
  • Rinse glasses, cutlery and vegetables in a basin of water, rather than under a running tap, and reuse the water for pot plants or in the garden.
  • Rinse water can be reused for the next cycle of washing up before being discarded.
  • Keep a bottle of drinking water in the fridge so that you don’t run lukewarm water down the drain when waiting for it to cool.
  • Run tap water into a bottle when waiting for it to heat up.
  • Thaw frozen foods in the fridge, sunlight or microwave rather than placing them under running water.
Save water in your bathroom
  • Close the tap when brushing your teeth. This saves up to 20 litres per month. Use a mug of water to rinse your toothbrush.
  • Plug the sink when shaving rather than rinsing your razor under running water. This saves up to 45 litres per month.
  • A half-filled bath uses about 113 litres, a 5-minute shower uses about 56 litres. Shower rather than bath, if you have to bath make it a shallow one or share it.
  • Reuse bath water in your garden.
  • Install a new water-saving toilet or put a clean, sealed plastic container filled with sand in the toilet cistern. This could save you up to 7 300 litres each year.
  • A toilet leak can waste up to 30 litres an hour – check if your toilet is leaking by adding a few drops of food dye to the cistern. If the colour seeps into the bowl, you have a leak, which should be fixed as soon as possible.
  • Install a water-saving shower head, take shorter showers, don’t run the water at full force and turn off the shower when soaping or shaving.
Save water in industries, businesses and schools
  • Automatic flushing urinals are the ultimate water wasters. If they cannot be replaced immediately, turn off the water after hours and over weekends – schools doing this have saved up to R5 000 on their annual water bill.
  • Flush valves should flush for just two to four seconds and urinals for six to eight seconds.
  • Regular maintenance of toilet fittings will save unnecessarily flushed water.
  • Ensure your plumbing systems are regularly checked for leaks.
  • Use a broom to sweep forecourts and other paved areas. Do not use a hose for this purpose.
  • Potable water must not be used to dampen building sand or other building material to prevent it from being blown away.

Original Source: Cape Town Green Map